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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
. i will tell you here and now that is not going to happen. we will still have u.s. troops in afghanistan one year from now two years from now, five years from now. where is the press? obviously, these are not issues that the people who run on these programs today -- >> why not? >> because they do not draw an audience. what draws an audience is charlie sheen. what draws an audience is people yelling at each other. it is not enough to say these issues are important. if we actually -- i know it sounds totally idealistic, but when you and i became journalists as young men, we actually believed that we were entering, really, a special, chosen profession that meant something to a democracy. >> we called it a calling. >> a calling, exactly. >> exactly. word of honor, i never thought i was going to get rich as a journalist. you do not go into journalism to become wealthy. >> the changes we are talking about, you have already touched upon the affect it has on our society, on the business itself. value systems change. i am not saying we can ever return to the good old days. that is
>> tonight, anthony kennedy talks about preserving the u.s. constitution followed by the history of the presidential appointment process. anthony kennedy talks about protecting and preserving the u.s. constitution. from the heritage foundation, this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and gentlemen. it is great for me to be able to join john in welcoming new year to this lecture. this is the fifth annual occasion on which we have had this lecture. the heritage foundation vision is to build an america where freedom, opportunity, prosperity, and civil society flourished. to help achieve this vision, the center launched the preserve the constitution series, which is an annual lecture series to inform and -- inform citizens on topics related to this constitution. the series promotes the protection of individual liberties, property rights, free enterprise, constitutional limits on government. we've been able to feature some of the nation's most respected judges, legal scholars, lawyers, and policy analysts. the marquee event is tonight's program. the namesake of tonight'
the executive director of the latino partnership for conservative principles. he was the first chief of the u.s. office of citizenship, appointed by president george w. bush. alfonso is responsible for developing initiatives and programs to educate immigrants about the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and encourage their integration into american civic culture. brad bailey is the founder and ceo of texas immigration solutions. to 2011, he was the order of houston-area -- owner of houst on-area restaurants. his group seeks to develop conservative solutions to immigration policy but he served on the 2012 platform committee of the republican party of texas. richard land is the president of the southern baptist convention's official added to address social, moral, and ethical concerns, with a particular attention to impact on american families and their faith. he is also the editor of a national magazine dedicated to coverage of traditional religious values, christian ethics, and cultural trends. last but not least, my friend ramesh ponnuru, senior editor for "national review" magazine an
that really did move to us consequential actions, 44'6" u.s. soldiers killed in iraq not to mention the other loss of life that occurred there. that really made a difference. and i would say that if you live in a glass house, don't throw stones. and there is no worthy reason to throw any stone at susan rice. >> very profound if you live in a glass house cast no stones. we've been joined by laura richardson from california. thank you for joining us here. this very unqualified woman of course spear headed efforts to bring the international sanctions against i ran, sanctions on -- iran, sanctions on north korea and has brought significant to bringing down kadafi. we now are going to hear from a very special colleague, terri sule from the seventh district of alabama. she has very special insight into the qualifications and integrity of susan rice. thank you for joining us. >> good morning. today i stand with my colleagues, proudly stand with my colleagues in expressing our outrage about the unfair attacks against the u.s. ambassador susan rice. these recent attacks are nothing short of offensive.
of honor recipients talk about why they joined the military. this is the highest u.s. military honor. it is using presented by the president of the united states. this is about 40 minutes. >> i am proud and honored today to introduce two of america's military is great is individual. he is a former staff sergeant in the united states army, the first living person to receive the united states highest award for valor. the second is james e. little stem. he was awarded the united states highest military decoration during the vietnam war. he served on active duty in the marine corps of our 33 years before returning on september 1, 1995. his decorations included the medal of honor, silver star medal, a bronze star medal, purpleheart, navy accommodation metadal. i now present the major general and staff sgt. [applause] >> the start of this in 2006. jerry certification at hotels and conference centers in new york and northern virginia. while serving as general manager as a resort in leesburg, he founded the national medal of honor society. 15 recipients participated. the went on to raise a t
the united states has -- enforces policies on other countries. if the states and the u.s. were to go to legalization, are we going to get ourselves but the trouble with any international organization or treaties we have signed? >> i did not know much about the treaty arrangement that the regulation drug distribution but i did read an interesting article that said the greatest loser when it came to the legalization of marijuana in the state's where the drug growers in mexico. that is not a treaty arrangement but obviously an economic arrangement that may have some political ramifications beyond just drugs. >> the prohibition counterpart to that, i enormous amount of liquor came in from the u.k. directly to the bahamas. nasa was a town of 700 people before prohibition -- nassau was a town of 700 people before prohibition di. the colonial secretary of the u.k. at that time was winston churchill. we can imagine what he thought about prohibition. he called that a front to the entire history of mankind. . >> if you could talk a little bit about the importance of studying constitutional his
, ever. >> of u.s. army retired -- i was with you this morning you receive the medal of honor at the sheraton hotel in washington, d.c. i met your wife also in the elevator and had a good chat with her, too. i did not know if she is here or not, but i would sure like to meet her again. when i talked -- you have, long way. one i talked you that they. you were going to go to the white house that morning. and that when i met you at the hotel. there were a whole bunch of 173rd guys there and i was there for the funeral of a guy i served in vietnam with the guys -- too see ed burke be buried. you just happen to be there waiting to go to the white house. and maybe you do not remember that. i gave him my card and i said if i could help you in any way, let me know. i am still around. it was an honor to meet you. and i've got a grandson in the big red one in afghanistan right now, and he got wounded about three weeks ago. just took a few mortar fragments in the legs and was calling home and saying he was sticking with the outfit and not getting medically evacuate. i just want to say, h
to state capitals around the u.s., have we missed the boat? if the industry got together and said let's get serious about these output metrics, whichever silo we're talking about, from a federal role, is it too late? in the area of waivers? >> if it's too late, it's not too late because of the waivers. i think we may have missed the boat because to be totally honest, i expected there to be advocates for scs. if it is more performance based, this is a way to keep the sector going. in fact, the sector did not have that kind of advocacy from folks who are involved in policy- making. i think that boat may have been missed, to come with a solution for folks to really stand up for it. >> supplemental -- tutoring, in terms of the reauthorization of a child behind? >> that is the first part. the second part is states are more likely, the states that are big supporters of supple little services, are more likely to maintain that position if they can come up with mechanisms for new accountability around it. and seeing examples of that starting to pop up, but none of them have taken off across multiple
, u.s. navy and the office of the director of national intelligence. embry-riddle aeronautical she has worked policy analysis, operations, information security, you name it. she went to a small school in vermont, st. michael's college. means she is a purple light. she is a purple knight. please give her a warm round. ound. ms. mary rose mccaffrey. >> can everybody hear me? i was asking if everybody thought i was giving out halloween candy for such a full audience. i want to thank each of you for coming out today. i know school is much more important than listening to me. for those who came from the industry, thank you for taking time out of your busy days. i have had an extraordinary morning with your students. i am very optimistic about our future. because each of you give me great faith that whatever challenges the intelligence community, the national security of the united states face, we are well poised and postured to address them, at the turn them, and figure out the solutions. so take you very much for the invitation. second data point -- even in the intelligence community, the
that they be more open, more responsive, more effective, or else. here in the u.s., you have had the tea party hammering big government and had the -- do the same to jolly backers on wall street and social medias are competing and we have to hope the more enlightened ones are winning the day. social movements like the one campaign. 3.2 million people at last count. asking the world to pay attention to the least amongst us. the very poorist of the world's poor and the many things we can do to help them, and as i'll describe, we'll see things are happening in the developing world. and but think about this particular moment. not just facebook and the heat of taxpayer roar your square, but the peace across the world of mobile phones. across the parched lands of the sahel and congo, technology is transforming things. everything is speeding up. everything is opening up. now, if i can talk about something i actually know about for a moment. this feeling reminds me a little bit, maybe more than a little bit of the arrival of punk rock in the mid 1970's. you see, the clash were the very base of the roc
, it will be a combination of guard and reserve and u.s. army reserve -- i mean, guard and reserve and u.s. army and active. there are characteristics that are important. people have been confused with what has been going on in the last five years and what we want in the future. in my mind, what happened in iraq and afghanistan is exactly how we designed it to happen. the active component responding initially was able to get things a establish, and then as we needed more depth, we were able to move into the national guard and reserve. that worked very well we are way more organized now in the army. there are some national guard and reserve units that have to be ready to deploy very quickly. those tend to be combat service support outfit that require much less trading capability. the guard and reserves issue is time, not money, but time. they only have so much time to sustain regiments. the characteristic of an active deployment is ready, and to maintain a level of readiness that they can respond to over a longer time frame. as i go through this, i have to balance that and decide what i need as they go forw
be standing or sitting here with us on u.s. soil receiving this honor, and as a member of the burmese parliament? back then we thought about granting the meddle in absentia, which may have -- medal in absentia, which may have been the first time in history that a person would have received it while in detention. who would have thought this change was possible? who would have thought this could happen? let me tell you one who believed it could come true, and that is aung san suu kyi herself. she might be too humble to admit it, but i know that she always thought this day, this moment would be possible. not because she is someone who worries about awards or honors, because i can tell you she certainly does not. she believed it because she and the burmese people always believed that change was possible. they hoped, they fought, the new change must come to their country. she knew the burmese people yearn for human rights and most importantly deserve democratic governance. she stepped the flames in a peaceful way for a lasting change -- stoked the flames in a peaceful way for lasting chang
an interventionist candidate and we have a bad history with intervention and the u.s. intervening in affairs and sometimes invading some countries like panama and the dominican republic a couple of times. and the fact that latinos don't consider socialism as evil. and in america if you hear comments from right wing radio host and news socialism is considered evil which and in latin america cast ro is very popular. >> host: were you surprised the latino vote hit the highest level in this election? caller: i was expected that. i was motivated to vote even though i'm in a democratic state, i knew obama was going to win here but i was motivated to vote because the way obama was non-niesed with -- from the press, the right wing and calling him names, calling him a socialist and i was very motivated to vote. host: what do the exit polls show motivated latino voters this cycle? guest: it's hard to get to motivation because they don't ask those questions but there are some things clear from the exit polls and reelection polls. one of them which is caller touched on is that for a lot of immigrants in
an attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. she has been cited as a possible candidate to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state. this is about 20 minutes. to talk about the disrespectful attacks on the united states permanent representative to the united nations, susan e. rice. we have a distinguished member here who was in a committee meeting, delegates eleanor holmes norton. she must return to the meeting. i will yield the microphone to occur before i introduce this group that has assembled here today. >> i appreciate the generosity of the chair of our democratic caucus. i appreciate particularly that you have brought us all together. while you see some of us here, i think i can say without fear of contradiction that we are speaking for many women members of congress and we are speaking for many members of congress regarding the treatment of ambassador susan rice. i happen to know her well because she is a constituent. i have that followed her extraordinary career from the time she was a child. some members of the senate seem to be able to contain themselves while we await the t
any further. >> let's go to this part of the room. let's go here. >> u.s. news and world report. it seems the coalition was unable biunique elements of this election. he have the bain background. how will they try to recreate the coalition? >> great question. a year ago, i would have said -- he ran poorly among blue collar and older whites. even with paul ryan on the ticket, a 60% of seniors voted for romney. in the long run, i think those red states are problematic for democrats. look at north carolina. in north carolina or virginia, obama's numbers among blue- collar whites are unbelievably low. they are in the high-20's or 30's. in the long run, i do think there is this pattern. the sun belt will be more important than the west about. they do have the incredible ability to hang on to -- the shift will be to states that have the same social forces of rising diversity and rising education levels. >> we have a slight disagreement. obama did well among these groups in 2008. democrats do well among white blue-collar voters in the midwest. there are union presidents and other thing
10 years. u.s. businesses would pay $430 billion in transportation costs, household incomes will fall by 7000, and exports will fall by $28 billion. meanwhile, we are falling behind in the global economy. china invests 9% in gross domestic product and infrastructure. here in america, we spend less than 2% of gdp on infrastructure. it is constant bipartisan support that can help close these gaps, restored bridges and water systems. we can do something about telecommunications across this nation, allowing us to build a twenty first century infrastructure. it can work to create jobs all across america. well paying jobs that can't be outsourced. we are once again making things in america, and this is a great nation that has been built on bricks and mortar and fiber optics. we have got to get back to doing that again. we do not have the time or the luxury to play little games. we did pass job legislation right now including an infrastructure by, when that will create jobs, spur investment, and rebuild america. but be introduced to you the chair of our democratic and congressional campaign
you for joining us. that is all for "washington journal" today. we will see u.s. 7:00 a.m. eastern tomorrow. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> president obama and republican mitt romney will be focused on ohio today, one day before election day. it will both be in columbus. president obama will start the day keeping me in madison, wisconsin. -- it will both be in columbus. mr. romney has four campaign stops today. manchester, new hampshire tonight. we are pleased to cover his million shares bought. c-span asked reporters and political analyst what they're watching for on election night, both on the national and state level. here is what they had to say. >> you always watched the first votes that, in. it varies from year to year. i have done this for decades and i care to remind you of. they come in different places. you have to know the history, county, to interpret the results. once we get a sizable lover of boats and, i will look at the critical counties in north virginia. i will look up to chesterf
-mails. later, supreme court justice anthony kennedy talks about preserving the u.s. constitution. coming up next, it is "washington journal" with james martin. he will talk about health care and older americans. that will be followed by a campaign to fix the national debt. a little bit later, we will talk ou
a year and over the next 10 years. it reads, u.s. businesses added $430 billion in transportation costs. u.s. exports will fall. meanwhile, we are falling behind in the global economy. china invests 9% of their gross domestic product in infrastructure. india, 5% and rising. in america, we spend less than 2% of gdp on infrastructure. it is a concept with broad and bipartisan support. it could help close the gaps. do something about bringing tele-communications across this nation. it could work to create jobs all across america. good jobs. that cannot be outsourced so we are once again making things in america, becoming more competitive in the global economy. this is a great nation. has been built on brick and mortar and fiber-optic spirit we have got to get back to doing that again. millions of families are struggling -- struggling right now. we need to pass jobs legislation right now, including an infrastructure bank. i was pleased to see the president spoke about an infrastructure bank today. it will create jobs for investments and rebuild america. let me introduce to you the chair of
on the u.s. diplomatic efforts in the middle east. in 45 minutes, and grossman from "the wall street
the president give allies that his administration will be able to reach some of a deal to prevent the u.s. and europe from going into another recession? >> obviously europe is dealing with their own challenges. we are connected and europe is our largest trading partner. i would point you simply to what the president said today which is that he appreciates what the speaker of the house has said this week that suggests a willing tons compromise. the president has made clear that he is willing to compromise. he thinks one of the clearest messages that the american people sent on tuesday was they want action and they don't want compromise to be a dirty word in washington. that we need to come together to deal with the challenge that is confront us that can only be resolved in a bipartisan manner when we have a government that continues to be divided. the president is confident we can do it if there is a willingness to approach this in a balanced way and compromise. and thus far he is hopeful that others in washington are taking that approach. >> will he be reaching out to any of the european
.8%, the unemployment rate, from september. showing 171,000 jobs added in october, this according to the u.s. bureau of labor statistics this morning. i want to get your quick reaction to those numbers. guest: first of all, that is virtually no change. yes, it is an uptick, and it was down the month before. but unemployment is staying basically around 8%. if you count the people of -- who have given up looking for jobs in this country, we have over 20 million people who are unemployed right now. we have to address their needs and concerns, and make sure they have jobs over the next four years. by producing 12 million jobs, a lot of these people will be put back to work. if we continue the policies of the last four years, i am afraid we will see the next norm for unemployment in this country will be 8%, and the unemployment figures are going to stay around that 20 million figure. i think we can do a lot better. i think governor romney certainly has a program to do that, he and certainly in ohio we have proven that it can be done. host: let us go to judith, on the democratic line. you are on. caller:
chairman of the democratic-led budget committee here in the u.s. house of representatives, current secretary of defense calls these defense cuts devastating. this u.s. house has passed a proposal to prevent that second round of cuts from taking place. it's the only proposal anywhere in this town to have passed. we did in august. we took care of our business and we have yet to have partnership from either the white house or the senate. on that proposal. we took the sequester replacement reconciliation act in may. we took care of the job prevention recession act in august, mr. speaker. we took care of the national security and job protection act in september, mr. speaker. the work of this house has been done. month after month after month. we passed two budgets in a row, mr. speaker, that take on the tough challenges of entitlement reform, that take on the tough challenges of increasing revenue, that take on the challenges that no congress in my lifetime has ever taken on, mr. speaker. we did it not once but we did it twice. and the silence from the senate and the white house has bee
best do that in the u.s. senate right now? i thought about that with my wife and children, and they have been such wonderful supporters, and i realize there is a gridlock. we cannot allow it to continue. we cannot have the nation we want if senate and congress is gridlock. i decided my experience as a tough times mayor and governor were an experience i could bring to the table to make good things happened in partnership with others. that was 19 months ago. we have trouble more than 60,000 miles. we have recruited more than 50,000 donors, including a deer i hit and killed, so we gave up a windshield process required and in the process. this campaign has taught me now more than ever we need people who know how to be partners rather than just partisans. we are americans but virginians furs. i learn this when i was the mayor. we knew who the democrats and republicans were. we were bipartisan. as a mayor, we were able to build schools common on -- to build schools, to cut crime, to clean up the river, and we did it by working together. as governor, you get a four-year term. min
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)